Fiona Davis’ List

This summer will be spent lying on a hammock when I’m not researching my next book, with a couple of trips to Sag Harbor as well as a post-Covid reunion with my long-time girlfriends. I’ll also be gearing up for the January 2022 release of my next book, The Magnolia Palace, which is set at one of New York’s finest museums, the Frick Collection.

 

The Plot
By Jean Hanff Korelitz

The Plot is a fast-moving story about a washed-up novelist and writing teacher who stumbles upon a student’s idea that’s a surefire bestseller. When he learns the student has passed away, the temptation to write that book is too great to pass up, with consequences that could be deadly. A fun mystery that offers a hilarious look at the dark side of the publishing industry.

What Comes After
By Joanne Tompkins
A violent act cleaves two families in the Pacific Northwest, leaving a father bereft and a mother haunted and ashamed. Into their midst comes a pregnant teenager who may or may not have a connection to their sons. As the story of what happened on that fateful night slowly unfolds, you’ll be fighting back tears. A remarkable tale of redemption and love.

The Show Girl
By Nicola Harrison
Although Harrison’s latest doesn’t hit bookshelves until August, it’s worth the wait. A Zeigfeld Follies dancer achieves great success on the New York stage, but her dazzling career is thrown into jeopardy when she meets the man of her dreams – or is he? Harrison bring jazz-age New York City as well as the tony enclaves of the Adirondacks to vivid life.

The Forest of Vanishing Stars By Kristin Harmel
Harmel follows up her smash hit The Book of Lost Names with another WWII novel, this one set in Poland, where a young girl raised in the woods encounters Jewish refugees hiding from the Germans and teaches them how to survive. Harmel tackles themes of identity and destiny with meticulous research and stunning prose.

Great Circle
By Maggie Shipstead

Shipstead’s third novel – an epic tale with two timelines – is the perfect summer read. In 1920’s Montana, a young girl is eager to learn to fly and will do anything to make her dream possible. In current day, a young actress whose career has taken a nosedive accepts the role of a famous vanished pilot. A lyrical and gripping read.

Libertie By Kaitlyn Greenidge
In post-Civil War Brooklyn, the Black daughter of a female doctor struggles to figure out what she wants out of life, whether to follow in her mother’s footsteps or marry a man promising a very different life in Haiti. This book drew me in from the very first sentence, and I can’t wait to see what Greenidge does next.

Amy Poeppel’s List

The paperback for Musical Chairs is out now. And my next book, The Sweet Spot, will be out in 2022!

Blush
By Jamie Brenner
Set at a winery on the North Fork of Long Island, Blush introduces us to the spirited women of the Hollander family, all of whom have secrets to keep and high-stakes problems to solve. Add the scandalous novels of Jackie Collins and Judith Krantz, and Jamie Brenner’s latest is a pure delight. Or as People magazine says, it’s a “summery rosé of a novel.”

The Guncle
By Steven Rowley

I love a book that highlights the humor to be found in difficult times, and The Guncle certainly fits the bill. This novel will have you laughing out loud one moment and holding back tears the next. I highly recommend the audiobook because the author himself narrates, and he’s wonderful at capturing the voices of Patrick and his young niece and nephew, Maisie and Grant. I did not want this book to end.

Convenience Store Woman By Sayaka Murata
Described in Vogue as “a literary prize-winner that’s also a page-turner,” this absorbing novel features an unforgettable character named Keiko who has never quite fit in. But as an employee at “Smile Mart,” she realizes she can follow the rules and appear “normal” … or almost. But even as she finds satisfaction at her job, she can’t seem to escape society’s pressure to conform.

Early Morning Riser By Katherine Heiny
Named “the funniest novel of the year” by The Washington Post, Heiny’s latest is just plain fabulous. Combining hilarious scenes with heart-wrenching ones, Heiny keeps her audience rooting for her quirky and memorable characters. As Jane builds a life in Boyne City, Michigan with kind, charming Duncan, she discovers that he comes with a heck of lot of baggage. But then again, so does she.

Somebody’s Daughter
By Ashley Ford

In a recent interview, Ashley C. Ford—named among Forbes Magazine’s 30 Under 30 in Media—said, “It is so hard to find a story about an incarcerated person that focuses in any way on the family that is left behind.” In her memoir, Ford shares the story of her adolescence and of her path to know more about her father. I highly recommend the audiobook to hear this powerful story in the author’s voice

The Baker’s Secret
By Stephen Kiernan

I always love reading a favorite author’s backlist, and this work of historical fiction by novelist Stephen Kiernan is spectacular. Taking place in Normandy, France during World War II, The Baker’s Secret introduces us to Emmanuelle, an industrious young woman who finds a way to save her village, thanks to her generosity, her ingenuity, her loyalty, and her desire to survive.